Thursday, January 14, 2016

Painting the "Bumperettes"

Bumperettes, as they are called, provide no protection in case of a collision, and I can only guess that they were intended as a design element. Big FAIL there.

I do not particularly care for the looks of them, but I do not necessarily hate them either. What I really dislike though, is when they are painted to match the color of the car. To me that indicates that a car has been repainted and they seem to be even more visible when color coordinated.

Since my Corvette was painted a darker shade of red at some point by the second owner (it was originally silver metallic), the bumperettes were also painted red, and I had to do something about that.

Painting bumperettes on the Corvette (when so equipped), is an easy job that can be done in a few hours, provided you have the necessary items to get the job done.



Properly masking areas to keep overspray away is a must. And of course you can use either making paper, although old newspapers or plastic will work just as well, and a good quality masking tape.

The area to be painted must be scuffed or sanded in order to remove any imperfections. And you can always use a glazing putty for tiny scratches. Deep gouges or other damage will require special fillers if the bumpers are OEM pieces, while Bondo® or fiberglass will work for 'glass bumpers.

After prepping the bumperette, remove any dust or dirt by wiping it down with mineral spirits or a tack cloth. At this point you are ready for primer (if so desired) and black paint.



For the finish, I like SEM Landau Black, even though it is an interior paint. I've been using Landau Black on exterior trim parts for years with excellent results. I particularly like the sheen of the cured paint and the fact that it dries extremely fast. Also, I did not see the need to spray primer on the bumperettes since they looked fine after I prepped them.

And here's the finished product with the correct look, as intended by Chevrolet. Spending a few minutes to ensure the masking is spot on, makes the end product look factory fresh.

 


The procedure for the front bumperettes is the same, of course, and the results are well worth the time invested,